Trump administration asks Supreme Court to strike down Affordable Care Act

Washington-DC

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — It’s been nearly three years since Congress voted to repeal one key part of the Affordable Care Act. 

Since then — the Trump administration’s been arguing the Supreme Court should strike the law down.

Minutes before Thursday’s deadline, the White House filed a brief asking the Supreme Court — to strike down the Affordable Care Act. 

“One hundred thirty-one million Americans will lose ACAs life saving protection,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said. “Twenty three million Amercans will lose their access to quality, affordable health care.”

The administration argues since Congress repealed the individual mandate — the law is no longer constitutional. 

Speaker Pelosi says striking it down in the midst of a global pandemic would be devastating.

“Many people who have lost their jobs have turned to the Affordable Care Act,” Speaker Pelosi said. “Their healthcare was tied to their jobs.”

Despite the lawsuit, house Democrats doubled down on the ACA — introducing the Affordable Care Enhancement Act this week — to expand the law.

“It also makes the exchange insurance plans more affordable,” Rep. Raul Ruiz, D-Calif., said. “It lowers the cost of prescription drugs.”

Under the bill, Congressman Raul Ruiz says more people will qualify for a subsidized insurance plan. 

He says ending the ACA would be a serious blow to low income Americans.

“Those are the vulnerable ones who are precisely at high risk of dying from COVID-19,” Rep. Ruiz said.

“The ACA was a failure from the beginning,” Rep. Doug Lamalfa, R-Calif., said.

Rep. Lamalfa defended the White House’ lawsuit. 

He says the ACA increased health care costs for too many families 

“Going back to the drawing board, yeah I know it’s difficult in this pandemic, but at some point we can’t keep propping up something that was broken,” Rep. Lamalfa said.

The court hasn’t said when it might hear oral arguments on the case.

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