Museum relics headed down I-29 to Sioux City

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“The resonance is just so incredible” says Deborah Reeves, Curator of Education & Woodwinds at the National Music Museum. 

This Indonesian gong is one in a set of 25 percussion pieces that is being packed up for a journey down I-29.
Along with four other instruments, it’s headed to the Orpheum Theatre to be played in next Saturday Sioux City Symphony performance celebrating the group’s 100th season.
 
Pots, gongs, bronze xylophones…curators at the National Music Museum in Vermillion say this set is one of the best in the world.
 
“We’ve been told by Javanese people that they have never seen anything quite like this, except in Java itself. So again, what a unique opportunity for the people of Sioux City to come and see and hear these instruments,” says Deborah Reeves, Curator of Education & Woodwinds at the National Music Museum. 
 
From Indonesia to Portugal, this harpsichord from the 18th century will also take the stage in Sioux City.
 
“You can see the maker’s name, Jose Calisto, 1780. This instrument is in almost original condition, and it still plays” says Rodger Kelly, Collections Manager at the National Music Museum. 
 
Kelly says this piece is exotic, made out of Brazilian wood and longer than most harpsichords. The history that comes with this piece will shine on stage through music.
 
“The person playing it Byron Schenkman, a harpsichordist from the Seattle area will be playing Bach’s F Minor Harpsichord concerto. And so more or less, this is the kind of instrument that Bach would’ve been familiar with” says Rodger Kelly, Collections Manager at the National Music Museum. 
 
It’s tedious work packing these relics for their trip, all in an effort to get them safely to the Orpheum stage, before they’re ‘music to the ears’ of Siouxlanders.

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